Jump to content
salford.media

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'tony flynn'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Categories

  • Local
  • Regional
  • National
  • World
  • Covid-19
  • Business News
  • History
  • Features
  • What's On
  • Out and About
  • Opinion
  • Traffic Alerts
  • Archived
  • Site News
  • Missing Alerts
  • Health
  • Education
  • Wanted
  • Weather

Categories

  • Television
  • Movies
  • Theatre
  • Books
  • Games
  • Technology
  • Restaurants
  • Pubs & Clubs

Categories

  • Salford Council
  • Elections
  • Manchester Council
  • Labour
  • The Conservative Party
  • CORE
  • Liberal Democrats
  • The Green Party
  • The Brexit Party
  • UKIP
  • Independent
  • Austerity

Categories

  • Red Devils
  • Swinton Lions
  • Salford FC
  • Salford Boys
  • Winton Wanderers
  • AFC MONTON
  • Beechfield United FC
  • Other

Categories

  • Chemists
  • Dental Surgeries
  • Doctors Surgeries
  • Taxi Ranks

Categories

  • Catering
  • Child Care
  • Cleaning
  • Construction
  • Clerical
  • Driving
  • Education
  • Engineering
  • Finance
  • Health & Leisure
  • Human Resources
  • IT
  • Vehicle Logistics
  • Admin & Management
  • Manufacturing
  • Marketing
  • Retail
  • Sales
  • Science
  • Security
  • Skilled Trades
  • Social Care
  • Travel
  • Media
  • Logistics

Categories

  • Houses For Sale
  • Houses For Rent
  • Apartments For Sale
  • Apartments For Rent
  • Retail Space For Sale
  • Retail Space For Rent

Salford Forums

  • Local Community
    • Claremont & Weaste
    • Eccles
    • Irlam & Cadishead
    • Little Hulton & Walkden
    • Ordsall & Langworthy
    • Swinton & Pendlebury
    • Worsley & Boothstown
    • East Salford
  • Things
    • History & Genealogy
    • Local Politics
    • Health & Fitness
    • Gardening & Allotments
    • Photography
    • Local Business Ads

Product Groups

There are no results to display.

Calendars

  • Salford FC
  • Community Calendar
  • Salford Reds

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me

  1. I told you last week about the amazing collection of books that have been inherited by David Jones, from his late father, Alan and how David was looking for a good home for them, preferably to a University, College, History Group or a keen local historian. I am happy to announce that since the article was published I was contacted by, Dr Brian Hall a Lecturer in Military History at Salford University, and Graham Walker an ex-soldier and keen military historian. We met up at David's house and it if fair to say that both men were delighted at both the sheer number of books and the wide variety of subjects that were covered. Brian took away several suitcases and boxes of books, mainly about World War One, which he will split between his own personal collection and the rest going to Salford University's Library, He told me that he was very pleased with what he was able to take home and that it had, made his week and will be a great help with further research and he would like to thank both David and myself for contacting him Graham who you may know from his Billy Unsworth research, a Salford man who fought in the Boer War, but then re-joined the army only to be killed at Gallipoli in 1915, which Graham has turned into both a song and a possible book/film venture. He also took away several boxes of books mainly about the Gallipoli campaign and books relating to local regiments. with which he was delighted. There are still quite a few books left on the shelves, relating to both WW! and WW2, history's of regiments, autobiographies from men who served in the Armed Forces including the R.A.F. and Royal Navy, maps, brochures and a great deal more. If you wish to claim some of these books, free of charge, then please contact me on Facebook or via my email address, salfordreds1950@gmail.com and I will arrange a suitable time for to call at David's, but please, no book dealers, these books are for the use of people who are truly interested in military history and would be ideal for history societies, retirement homes etc. Please hurry as David will be selling the property shortly and needs to clear out the collection as soon as possible, so if you are interested in this once in a lifetime chance to obtain these books, please contact me.
  2. Following on with our recent articles and videos about the abandoned and forgotten graveyards of Barton upon Irwell, the story takes another twist. Whilst we were filming in the Barton upon Irwell Wesleyan Methodist graveyard on Barton Road, the one that that mired in controversy when the developer callously smashed the headstones and was forced to put them back, which he did, but not in the original sites. Amongst the rubbish that had been dumped there, we noticed a small, black marble headstone. that had been left and it was obviously a fairly recent headstone with gilt lettering and no sign of wear. It reads, In Loving Memory of Darren L O'Brien, Died 6th July 2019,Aged 42 Years. One of our readers, Debbie Milton contacted us this week to ay that the headstone was still there and wondered if it had been stolen and dumped there? I fear this is one of those cases which has more questions than answers, who was Darren OL O'Brien, was he a local man, who paid for the headstone, why was it left in the Barton Wesleyan, is their a family connection to this burial ground, has it been removed from another graveyard in the area, All Saints and St Catherine's can be ruled out I should imagine, that leaves Peel Green cemetery, but why remove it and place it here? To my untrained eyes it doesn't appear to have been in the soil at all, also it is a small size, possibly an addition to a family grave. I would love to find out who, Darren was and how and why his headstone has ended up in the Barton Wesleyan burial ground in such undignified circumstances, so if you have any knowledge of this, we would love to hear from you and return the headstone to it's rightful owners.
  3. I called in at Morrisons Store in Eccles today for a chat with Sue Marsh, The Community Champion for the store. My visit was to discuss a possible book signing for the History of Eccles Pubs book, and the use of a table and chairs in a suitable Covid free, socially distanced environment. no doubt close to the recycling bins where our office is situated, All monies raised will be split between The Mustard Tree Foodbank in Eccles, and Broughton House, The Armed Forces Rest Home, and who knows perhaps Morrisons may purchase a copy or make a donation to the two nominated charities? My plea for help seems to have worked as the matter is being handed to the store supervisors, so fingers crossed for a week on Saturday between 12-m and 2pm depending on how many people turn up or we slope off to the pub with the takings Sue asked if we would kindly mention that Morrisons are giving away, free of charge, packets of sunflower seeds, at the tills with no purchase needed. as part of the Seeds of Hope campaign. The reason being is that they want to help celebrate the growing sense of national optimism with the decline in Covid cases by planting these sunflowers across the UK, representing the brighter and lighter times of hope ahead. Seems fair enough to me, I love Sunflower plants and had two growing at Alma Towers, last year bright and cheerful they are. I have been given quite a few packs, so just think, a free packet of sunflower seeds with every book purchased!
  4. Over the past few weeks we have telling you about Sue Richardson and the excellent work she has been doing for over 40 years in publishing local history books that cover both Salford and Manchester at affordable prices. I first met Neil in 1977 and together we set about doing extensive research into Salford pubs, photographing them, chatting to customers and Landlords alike, and yes we did imbibe quite a few pints, but serious research can be thirsty work.....I digress. Looking back, I am so glad we did the Salford pub books,because as you know Salford has lost so many pubs for so many reasons, and we managed to document their history's for posterity. In 1981 I branched out on my own when Neil went full time as a printer/publisher and author, I decided to write a history of the pubs of Eccles from 1772 onwards, some 40 pubs. Only 1.000 were run off and quickly sold out I'm happy to say, the printing plates were never used again and have been lost over the years. I have been asked many times to do an up to date version, but to be honest I haven't the inclination and things are moving so fast the new updated book would soon be redundant, and I am a lazy sod. You can imagine my shock when I saw a copy for sale on the Amazon site for a staggering £500 a few years back, my spirits were lifted when I was told there was a copy on sale in an Oxfam Charity Shop in Cheshire, for the knockdown price of £250...well if you are daft enough to pay that, good luck to you, I wouldn't. However I was chatting to Sue at weekend and I mentioned that I usually do a history walk around Eccles twice a year to raise both money and food for the Mustard Tree Foodbank and Broughton House, the nursing home for armed forces veterans. The Covid crisis has wiped out one of the walks for certain, however. With advances in printing techniques, Sue has told me that we can now reprint A History Of The Pubs Of Eccles, be still my beating heart! I have decided if enough people are interested in buying a copy, we can run off a strictly limited number of the book, each one numbered and signed, and the profits to be shared between above named charities. The sticking point is how many to reprint and how much to charge? I think 100 to be published and charge a £10 a copy is about right, and yes I know it was originally only a quid but that was nearly 40 years ago and the money is for charity and not for my Swiss bank account or for paying for the upkeep of Alma Towers, West Wing. So there you go, so if you are interested in purchasing a valuable piece of social history which is bound to increase in value over the years, an ideal gift for your grandchildren. a talking point when left on your smoked glass coffee table, you know the dance, let me know?
  5. I have heard the saying that if you go in somebody's you can guarantee there will be a glass from a local pub in there, I think this saying can be extended to a copy of a Neil Richardson, local history publication. We visited Sue Richardson's house in Ringley Village to see a truly amazing collection of books, Trade Directories, maps, photographs and even a bound collection of the Manchester Guardian newspaper from 1821 - 1972, a historians dream. Neil who sadly passed away in 2006 was good friend of mine and I am proud to have known him, I first met him in 1977 when he was the Editor of the Camra magazine, What's Doing, an hilarious and often Irreverent newsletter about local pubs and breweries. Together with Alan Gall we wrote , A History of Salford Pubs volume one, this was published in 1978 and from then on things snowballed as Neil assisted by Sue set up his own publishing company and began publishing affordable, local history publications, and put in print many. many authors, myself included whose work, would have never seen the light of day. His publications covered a vast area of Salford and Manchester with such topics as Salford Docks, memories of Hulme, Rochdale, Oldham, Bury, Miles Platting. Hanky Park, Weaste, housing conditions in Victorian Manchester, the history of long defunct breweries and pubs, cinemas, dance halls, policing, WW! and WW2 local regiments, the Blitz and far to many to mention here, in all some 200 publications were printed, this has now been whittled down to around 100 or so. Sue Richardson has continued with this legacy and from home still reprints much of the back catalogue and the odd new publication, single-headedly, a cottage industry you could call it, but more importantly she provides an invaluable service for both the keen local historian and the person who has a love for a certain area and likes to reminisce about days gone by. I am delighted to say that Sue has managed to keep up, just printing the books but has been hard hit for sales with the Covid crisis, however she has informed that she is still doing postal sales and can be contacted at home where she will be happy to discuss sales with you, but please phone before calling at her home address. Please contact Sue on 01204 578138 or via email at wattywalton@btconnect.com Or If you send a Stamped Addressed Envelope to Sue at 88 Ringley Road, Stoneclough, Radcliffe, Manchester, M26 1ET. She will send you a catalogue of all of the over 100 books available Finally Sue tells me that her email is a bit slow at the moment but rest assured each one will be answered, if you get stuck, you can message me at, tony@salford.media and I will pass messages on. So please support your local small business at this most testing of times and Sue fully deserves all of our help and support For a full list of available books please attached file: Download
  6. Salford's favourite historian, accomplished author and respected local journalist, Mr Anthony Errol Flynn, has announced that he is standing as an independent candidate for the position of City Mayor in the upcoming Salford elections which are to be held this May. Tony cuts a popular figure within Salford, having amassed a considerable following over the years due to his immense encyclopaedic knowledge of the cities history as well as his wit, humour and philanthropy. Speaking on the steps of Swinton Civic Centre, Tony told us: Tony went on to speak about his election pledges: Tony hopes to have his full politically correct 'personifesto' out later this week once it has been finalised and printed for free on the photocopiers at Eccles Library.. For a full copy of the 740 page hard back booklet which comes with a free copy of his Eccles pub book, you can contact him on 0161 820 2411 and leave a message starting with the words 'In Like Flynn'.
  7. I came across this amusing story from the pages of The Eccles and Patricroft Journal for October 1970 and relates the story of a young lad who took the bottle at far too early an age. Ronald Dempsey Dixon lived at 23 Police Street, Patricroft and one evening he brought home half a bottle of whiskey for "medicinal purposes" and put it in a cupboard for safe keeping and told his three sons , Jeffrey (8), Alan (7) and Kenneth (4) that they must not touch it. You just know this isn't going to end well. On the Sunday morning two of the boys went downstairs, when Kenneth shouted up the stairs, "Dad, Alan's been at the bottle!" Jeffrey explained to his Dad that they had each had a sip, but did not like it, however Allan wasn't going to be off that easy and continued drinking... Ronald explained what happened next. "I checked the bottle and it was empty! Allan had drank the lot, I called him downstairs to explain what had happened. " He walked down the stairs quite naturally then was violently sick on the living room floor and then collapsed, so I ran to the nearby Police Station for help". On duty was Policewoman, Nancy Rushton , she raced to the house but Allan was unconscious and could not be revived, an ambulance was called for and Allan was taken to Eccles and Patricroft Hospital. He was given a stomach pump and the alcohol was washed out of him with Allan howling as he regained consciousness, he was then detained in hospital overnight for observations. He was released the next morning, with no doubt a splitting headache and returned home a sadder and wiser boy. He told the Eccles Journal that he got a stool and climbed up to the cupboard and added that it did burn his stomach but carried on drinking. The last word went to his mother who said, "Colds or no colds I don't want to see any more of that stuff in this house!" So did young Allan learn his lesson? Is he a Tee-Totaller, I think we should be told. If anybody knows Allan please let him know or us! Cheers!
  8. I came across this story from December, 1920 in the pages of the Salford City Reporter and it tells what happens when love breaks down and tempers get frayed. Lucy M Roberts who resided at Albany Street, Salford appeared at the Stipendiary Magistrates Court asking for a separation from her husband, Thomas who was a commissionaire at Salford Town Hall, Bexley Square. She told the Magistrates that he was her second husband and they had been married since June, 1917, but she had left him, last Tuesday because of his persistent cruelty. At the end of November he didn't give her any housekeeping money until the Sunday at 9.30pm which meant she was unable to buy any food for the house. The following day she purchased bacon and bread and made a breakfast, with her daughter from her first marriage sat beside her, the girl had the temerity to put her cup of tea, close to Thomas's plate, who with the back of his hand pushed it away spilling tea over the table and the girl, saying he was not going to allow people to do what they liked at his table. Lucy told him that her daughter was allowed to sit at the breakfast table, that her own Father bought, this obviously touched a nerve with Thomas, who said that they wouldn't be able to do as they liked at the breakfast table. As if to prove his point he chucked the contents of the table into the open fire, and smashed the cups and saucers, then added that he was going out for a policeman to witness what had happened and stormed off. No policeman appeared so Lucy went looking for one, and showed him the scratch marks on her face which she said he had caused, would appear no action was taken so she decided to pursue the matter in the courts. Back in the dock she told the Magistrate that he talks in his sleep all night, and hardly sleeps, but when he is awake accuses her of seeing other men. In March this year she had him at court on a summonses for putting her daughter's only costume and hat up the chimney whilst they were out, adding that he threatened her and promised worse was to come. Mr Desquesnes for the Defence asked if things were unpleasant between Thomas and her daughter, she told him that she hadn't spoken to him since June, six months ago, and he had told her that he didn't want her living there, also it was her Fathers home and I have said I will keep a home for her. Things got a tad, heated when Mr Desquesnes suggested that she was more attached to her daughter than her husband, and that if she left, she would follow her, she vehemently denied this and said he was the one causing all the trouble, also he gave her £2.15 shillings a week and accused her of being extravagant whilst he had bought two suits of clothing and spent £7 on a new gramophone. The daughter, Gladys May took the stand and said that when Thomas tipped the table into the fire, she had to stop him from beating her mother, such was his temper. At last, Thomas took the stand and said that he was living at nearby Florin Street and was a Commissionaire at Salford Town Hall earning £3- 12 shilling a week he also received a pension of three shilling a week and told a tale of woe. He said that home life was very unhappy and that his wife was constantly knocking him about, and had called him, "A dirty old pig" and that he had to report for duty at The Town Hall with scratches and bruises ion his face. As for the breakfast table incident he said that Gladys had told him that the table was her father's not his to which he had replied that the things on it, were his and pushed it into the fire. The Stipendiary granted a separation order and ordered Thomas to pay 30 shillings a week to Lucy. Not sure what to make of this case, obviously both, better off not being under the same roof, possibly the marriage may have survived if there was no third party, lets hope they both lived happily ever after.
  9. An amusing story from the pages of the Salford City Reporter, December 1920 in which two chaps reason for being on enclosed premises was taken with a pinch of salt. Herbert, Henry Green and Thomas Costigan who both resided at Mottram Street, Salford appeared at the Quarter Sessions charged with breaking and entering, Wolf Halons, outfitters shop on Lower Broughton Road, Broughton. Police Constable Roberts told the Magistrate that he was on duty, when he heard the crash of glass from the rear of Mr Halons, outfitters shop, he went to investigate and found a pane of glass had been smashed. As he peered in to the shop, something was thrown at him, narrowly missing his head and hitting the window frame, he cautiously entered and found Green and Costigan hiding in the cellar. He asked if there were any more people with them, to which, Green replied, "We have pals outside and if your not careful, you'll be shot" Not the wisest of things to say even if in jest I would have thought. Mr McKeever for the Defence asked P.C. Roberts, " Was it not true there were a crowd of civilians outside the shop, and that these two men, did what you were afraid to do, and entered the shop?" This was denied by the P.C,. He was then further asked if that the two men inside the shop were pulling his leg when they said he would be shot. Again the less than amused P.C, denied these accusations. Henry Gilbert Green took the stand and gave his account of the night in question. "We were both a bit inebriated and we heard a smash of glass so we went to investigate, we went into the backyard of the shop and found the door open., so we decided to go in and look for the robbers. "The constables arrived and found us in there, we thought we were doing them a good turn looking for the robbers" The jury found them both guilty, Green was sent to prison for four months with hard labour, Costigan was said by the police to have been led into the affair by Green was bound over to keep the peace. Justice was served and no doubt Mr Green was able to reflect on his wicked ways and wicked quips in his cell at Strangeways prison.
  10. Cross Lane in Salford was once a busy, bustling thoroughfare with 18 pubs, three music halls, an Army Barracks, an open market, shops galore and one of the largest open cattle markets in the country, hard to believe if you drive or walk along it today. November 1920 and Emily Johnson was helping out at her Grandmother's tripe shop at 26 Cross Lane, James Smith and Samuel Royle came into the shop and ordered some pigs trotters, they stood at the counter and began to eat them, as Emily came out of the kitchen area, she saw Smith leaning over the counter, he asked for some trotters and was served with them. Just then a young boy came into the shop to tell her that the coal delivery had arrived and she had to go in to the back so that they could drop the coal in the yard which she did. Coming back into the shop she was horrified to see Smith behind the counter tampering with the cash drawer, she rushed to the shop door and asked a passer-by to call the police as she was being robbed, they tried to push her aside but she blocked the doorway. They then ran through the kitchen into the yard pursued by Emily, who managed to drag Smith to the ground, after a struggle he managed to escape, with Royle opening the back door for them to get away. However this isn't the end of the story you may be pleased to hear. By a simple twist of fate (courtesy of Bob Dylan) the two men were arrested a few days later for attempting to steal a half hundred weight of currants from a parked lorry on Oldfield Road but were seen by a Mrs Ogden who raised the alarm and gave the police such a good description they were arrested the same day and taken to the local police station. Who was in the police station? none other than the coal delivery boy who recognised the two men who had stolen the six shillings from the tripe shop and they were charged with this offence as well as the attempted theft of the currants. They appeared before Mr. C. C. Goodwin at Salford Magistrates Court and it was revealed that both men had numerous convictions for theft. Detective Sgt, Needham told the court that. Smith was "One of the worst characters in Salford, and never does anything but look for trouble and hasn't worked for two and a half years since leaving the army and lives on his pension of £2, five shilling a week" This seemed to strike a chord with the Magistrate who said that this matter of his pension would be investigated and then gave them both six months imprisonment with hard labour. A harsh sentence, possibly but these two chaps do appear to be petty criminals with not a care in the world, no idea if Smith's army pension was stopped, be the final slap in the face for him if it was.
  11. I came across this story from November, 1920 in the pages of the Salford City Reporter and tells of the misfortunes of the doziest thief in Salford. Thomas Callaghan, 30 was a seaman from Liverpool appeared at Salford Magistrates Court charged with attempting to cheat or defraud by false pretences, James Clark, which seems a clear cut. case. Callaghan was on Trafford Road close to the dock gates, when he approached Mr Clark and asked if he was interested in buying a ring from him, for £1 and going as far to say that the ring came from a jewellers shop that he had burgled in Liverpool, and that he had a few more to sell. He gave Clark the ring to examine, who looked at it underneath a street lamp to ascertain if it was genuine, only to be told, "be careful there could be a policeman about" Clark said he was interested but only had ten shillings on him but if Callaghan would come home with him, he would give him the full amount, to which he agreed. As they walked along Trafford Road, Callaghan was unceremoniously bundled into the Trafford Road, Police Station by Clarke who then revealed his identity as, Dock Police, Superintendent Clarke,, I can just imagine the look on Callaghan's face as he realised what a clanger he had dropped. The ring was examined by a local jeweller and found to be a cheap brass and glass copy, a further cheap, brass signet ring was found on Callaghan when he was searched, not looking good for him, is it? He appeared at the Magistrates Court the next day after a night spent in the cells, no doubt kicking himself, silly. To his credit he pleaded guilty and said the rings were one's he wore himself, then added that he thought Superintendent Clark was an old shipmate and that it was meant as a joke. This was met with laughter from the Magistrates bench, but it didn't last long. They sentenced the hapless, trickster to three months in prison with hard labour.
  12. KARL

    TOMMY'S STORY

    I was delighted to receive a book this week by local author, Alan J Denny, entitled, Tommy's Story which is a real Boys Own Adventure story and the beauty for me is that it's all true and our hero, Tommy is a Salford lad. It is a book that came about from stories that Alan was told as a child by his Mother, he was so fired by these tales that he took it on himself to speak to Tommy and record his memories for posterity and what a story it is. Tommy was born in the Lower Broughton area of Salford in 1915, a child born into hardship but a loving family which is richly chronicled and is worthy of a book in itself. Like so many young men in Salford when war was declared he was keen to enlist aged 24 with a young wife at home. after the phoney war period he found himself on a troop ship heading for North Africa and this is where this, gripping tale, starts. He finds himself in combat in the Libyan Desert with the 7th Armoured Division taking on the might of the Italian and German Army at Benghazi and Tobruk, the attention to detail is meticulous when it comes to describing the vehicles, guns, machinery used and no punches are pulled either when we get to the combat scenes. I feel that I shouldn't give too much away here, let us just say that Tommy is taken as a P.O.W and incarcerated in Tripoli but the story doesn't end there, far from it and if this was a work of fiction you wouldn't believe it.. Adventure upon adventure follow with bizarre twists and turns and at times, I burst out laughing at his escapades, an amazing man. I would urge you to read this book, it is not only a book for the connoisseur of WW2 literature, but a well crafted and researched piece of work, and so obviously written with love and affection, not just a war story but also a in depth look at the man. All credit to Alan for what is a splendid and thoroughly enjoyable read, first class and a worthy addition to any book shelf. The book is available online through Waterstones, and Amazon in both paperback and e-book format, the price fluctuates from site but is usually £8.99. Or it can be purchased direct from Alan for £7.99 + PP and he will sign and dedicate the book for you if required. tommysstory96@yahoo.com or visit https://www.facebook.com/Tommys-story-877110135798925/about/
  13. Last month I wrote a story about two young Salford lads, Arthur Smith and Cecil Wilkinson who lived at the Height area of Salford, who were charged with causing over £1,000 worth of damage to homes, shops and businesses including the strangulation of a cat whilst burgling a factory. They were sent to the Assize Courts for sentencing and at the time I had no access to give you what sentence they would receive and what the judge would have to say about their shameful behaviour. I have found the relevant story from November 1920 and to be quite honest the sentence they received wasn't what I was expecting considering the charges laid against them. To their credit they pleaded Guilty to the three charges of breaking and entering a private school in Acresfield Road, arson at the Olympia Cinema and damaging motor cars at Messr Carter's motor works, in Trafford Road. Mr Gilbert Jordan, prosecuting told the court that the boys had broken into properties and at the private school, smashed eggs, threw flour about then tried to light a fire with some scrap paper. On October 24th they broke into The Olympia Cinema and set fire to it causing damage estimated at £326 and on the same evening they broke into the motor works causing damage estimated at £150 also strangling the works cat. Mr J. B. Sandbach defended the boys and said the boys were "respectfully connected", they had excellent school records and their character at work was good and both of the boy's employees wrote them a character reference. Mr Justice Ashton who was in charge of the proceedings, said, " What they really want you know, is a good thrashing, nobody wants to make a gaol bird of boys like these" Mr Sandbach then went on to offer a possible explanation for the boys behaviour, he said that when they were arrested they were found to have in their possession, what were described as "Penny Bloods", cheap. lurid. comics of the times, he then suggested that the boys were trying to emulate the criminals that were depicted in these comics. He then added that he, had, the rector of the parish with him, Rev H. Boddington who would tell of the boy's home conditions, to which Justice Ashton suggested that perhaps he could administer the punishment? Cecil Wilkinson took to the stand and told the court that the only explanation he could offer for his son's behaviour was the reading of the Penny Bloods as he had never given any trouble at home. Justice Ashton then said, "What he wants is the best thrashing a boy ever had, and you are the man to give it to him, will you see that it is done?" Mr Wilkinson agreed to this. Arthur Smith's Father told the court he had no answer for his son's behaviour, and was told by Justice Ashton. "Oh it is perfectly simple, these boys have been reading this disgusting and pernicious literature and from what I have been told your son is the leader" He then retired into his chambers for a consultation with the Governor of the prison, Mr H. FitzClarence. The boys were brought back up for sentencing and Justice Ashton said they deserved the biggest thrashing, consistent with humanity. He then sentenced the boys to be bound over and warned about coming up before him, again and then impressed upon the fathers the need for severity in their thrashings which he left in their hands, and they were free to leave the court. I can't but wonder if the same sentence would have been handed out if say, the two lads came from an impoverished background and were unemployed, I doubt it very much. Hopefully the two miscreants went on to live happy, honest and worthwhile lives and reflected upon their close call with imprisonment.
  14. Let's roll back the clock to the golden, idyllic, Summer of 1970 when Brazil won the World Cup, 4-1 against Italy, The Beatles disbanded, 600,000 people gathered at The Isle of Wight to watch, Jimi Hendrix, The Who, Tiny Tim, Mungo Jerry were top of the charts with, In The Summertime and the Drug Squad in Eccles were flexing their truncheons. At 12.15am, Saturday, July 11th the police raided a house on Abbey Grove, Eccles and several people there were arrested and taken to Green Lane Police Station for questioning, and were told there was reason to believe that they had been smoking, cannabis! The accused were, Anne Higginson, Patrick Mullin, Alan Goldson, James Smith and a unnamed 15 year old boy, who became my Brother in Law, Mick Scahill, and what an excellent chap he was. a fine husband, father and friend, R.I.P. Several of them admitting smoking "pot", including Mick, bless him and according to Chief Inspector Wood, Higginson said, " "Why charge everybody?, it's my room let the others off" In court she denied saying this. Chief Inspector Wood told Eccles Magistrates Court that the warrant was executed at Abbey Grove, which was described as being a large house, divided into flats and damningly the occupants had no right to be living there and paid no rent to the owner and were basically, squatters! He then went on to describe the living conditions of the house, which at times is laughable, he said the premises were in a dilapidated condition with "paintings on the wall in bright colours, including flowers and other articles" "Most of the rooms are in an indescribable condition with filthy walls and floors, and no attempt has been made to clean them, they are squatters and should not be there" When the police went into a room rear of the house on the first floor they found, 30 home made cigarette ends and a piece of substance which was believed to be cannabis. D. C. Park really got into the swing of it when he told the Magistrate that when he entered a room it became obvious that cannabis had been smoked and. ."It was quite apparent to me a drug orgy had taken place" Yes he actually used the words, "drug orgy" this was Eccles not The Sphan Ranch with Charlie Manson and his gang. Mullin objected to the police description of the rooms and said they were being treated as "queer people" and that this was going on all over the world. The Chairman of the Court, Mr B. Hodgson told Mullins hat as long as he obeyed the law he could within reason do what he wanted. Mr Mullins then went into a wonderful speech in which he said there was no loud music as the record player was broken and they were chatting about, the Universe, The Cosmos and love when the police broke into the room and ordered him to strip off whilst they searched him for cannabis, a bit of a rude awakening I should imagine. "Basically I am a peaceful person, but know I am more antagonistic, how would you like it if a stranger came to your house, when you are having your tea, and tell you to take your clothes off for an examination for cannabis" He has a point. The Deputy Clerk of the Court told him that it was illegal, to which he replied. ..."It was illegal to be a Christian at one time" The trial was quickly descending to farce when he was asked what he did for a living, he replied, "I simply smile at people" The others admitted smoking cannabis but denied they were doing anything wrong and awaited their fate. The Magistrate fined them all £25 each and were given a warning about their future conduct and ordered out of the house on Abbey Road, justice had been done. I can remember the "Eccles Commune" as it became known and to be honest it was a bit of a novelty and not den of iniquity the police made it out to be, laughable really. Mick Scahill told me they knew they were due for a visit from the police because two days earlier, two men with fake Irish accents knocked on the door asking to buy "pot" and asking if there were and "chicks" living there...Hmm who could that have been. The house has since been demolished but they say if you walk past on a hot Summers night, the smell of patchouli oil and Red Lebanese can be smelt on the evening breeze...
  15. I loved this story which was in the October edition of the Eccles and Patricroft Journal in 1970 and talk about gripping the reader by the throat with the first line, have a read of this, word for word. "Soccer hooligans, skinheads, hippies, yippies, Hells Angels - the headline hoggers of today. "Youths with a vengeance and a vandal breeding boredom, quite incomprehensible to their forefathers with the abundance of recreational facilities available. "Gangs sharing the view that violence and theft are OK, offloading their consciences onto friends by collective action, Nomadic groups sharing an ideology. "A small element who through their rejection of society's accepted standards, make the news, yet those who do help their "neighbour", so often go without a mention". Have you any idea what he is wittering on about? Hold on because it's not all wild and crazy kids, slashing the seats, shooting and a looting. Into the limelight come Phase 70 a Peel Green based group devoted to aiding charities, one of the founder members was The Rev Dick Hatch, Vicar of St Michaels and All Angels, who was alarmed at the falling numbers at the church's youth club. Rev Hatch explains all or most of it, "There are no individuals in Phase 70, we are a non - denominational group who have gathered together in a form of experimental communism, that is we sit down and plan projects which we execute together for various charities." "There were 17 founding members whose occupation range from labourer to tax inspector and we have five new members all eager to pool their talents" One of their first projects was a marathon dictionary read outside Eccles library in February, working in relays and finishing at five in the morning after having completed 60 hours of continuous dictionary reading which raised £100 for the Moat Hill Autistic Unit in Peel Green. Since then they raised money for a concert for Senior Citizens, £20 for Shelter, a folk concert at Worsley Court House and £20 to sponsor a boy in Nigeria. The group meet on a Sunday and take it in turn to act as Chairman and listen to talks by the Police, Probation Services etc and regardless of age it's Christian names all round. "Young people wishing to become members have to apply in a fairly formal fashion" said Rev Hatch. "We only accept those who are prepared to give themselves to the aims and works of the group" Were you a member of Phase 70? I have read quite a bit about Rev Dick Hatch and he was quite a character by all accounts ending up having a Radio Show on the BBC. Would the youngster of today join such a group though? to be honest I can't see it, sound in principle but those days have gone I'm afraid and as for standing outside Eccles library reading aloud from a dictionary for hours on end.....
  16. A rather sad and cautionary tale from the pages of the Salford City Reporter from October 1920 which gives an insight into the way that habitual drunkards were treated at the time and how times have changed. Violet Whittle a 40 year old woman of no fixed abode appeared at Salford Magistrates Court, charged with being drunk and disorderly on Chapel Street, Salford the night before. It would appear that Violet was no stranger to the court and was "fond" of a drink as they say. Superintendent Clarke told the Magistrate that Violet was last before the court on September 16th (less than a month ago) and had been fined £1 for drunkenness and that within the last twelve months had been arrested for the same offence, seven times, giving her a total of 34 criminal convictions. The previous evening when arrested on Chapel Street she was abusive to the arresting officer, P,C, Nolan. and in the cells she behaved, "in a disgraceful way", then added. "If she cannot conduct herself properly when sober, I can imagine what she will be like in drink" The newspaper reported that Violet has, "stood erect and attentive" when the above was read out to the court, the suddenly burst into tears and shouted out, "I'm cast down!, I'm broken hearted, I only came out of prison yesterday, I don't have a dogs chance, the police are always locking me up" The Magistrates Clerk tried to reason with her and explained it was because she always went back on the drink. Poor Violet answered, "I would be better off dead, for I'm always in prison". Superintendent Clarke then told the court that Violet had been sent to the Langho Inebriates Reformatory in 1906, but had not seemed to have cured her.. Langho Inebriates Reformatory opened in 1904 and housed some 300 women, was situated, seven miles from Blackburn, it later became a hospital for people with learning disabilities and closed in 1992, and have heard some terrible stories about the way the early patients were treated. Having heard all the evidence, the Magistrates, Alderman Mather and Mr F. P. Nathan in their wisdom saw fit to send Violet to prison for one month with hard labour added for good measure. How on earth is sending her to prison going to help this poor woman, who by her own admission stated she would be better off dead than in prison, she did need medical help and I'm certain the harsh regime in Strangeways prison didn't extend to this.
  17. The Height and Bolton Road areas of Salford were subjected to a fortnight's rampage of burglary, arson and theft which only ended when two youths aged 15 and 16 appeared at Salford Magistrates Court in October 1920 and the full story unfolded. Mrs Lewthtwaite owned a supper bar on Broad Street, Salford and on the previous Thursday evening at 10pm, she was in the kitchen of her house, when she heard a loud bang and glass breaking, she saw Cecil Wilkinson drop into her yard. Her son ran out and apprehended him, only to be told that he was looking for his ball, he then saw another boy nearby, who ran away when approached, the police were sent for and Wilkinson was taken into custody for questioning. Wilkinson soon told the police the name of his accomplice, Arthur Smith and he was soon arrested and brought into custody. Superintendent Clarke questioned the boys and they readily admitted that, they intended breaking into the barbers shop next door to the supper bar and were looking for money to steal. However once they started confessing they couldn't stop and told an astonished Superintendent Clarke a long list of their misdemeanours, they had carried out in the past fortnight. At the Magistrates Court he applied to have the boys remanded in custody for a week whilst further cases might be investigated, the remand was granted and both boys. despite their age where remanded to Strangeways prison. One week later the two boys, Cecil Wilkinson of, Saxby Street and Arthur Smith of Bolton Road, Pendleton stood in the dock and a remarkable catalogue of their crimes was read out. Breaking and entering, 34 Acresfield Road and stealing foodstuffs to the value of £1, 18 shillings and ninepence. Setting fire to The Olympia Picture Palace, West Street, stealing 10 shillings and a quantity of chocolate. damaging seventeen seats and a piano. Damaging and spoling five motor cars, a planing machine and a band saw at Messr Thomas Carters Motor Works, Trafford Road. Setting fire to St Thomas's School, Broughton Road, Salford. Breaking and entering Messr Lancaster and Tonge's offices, Withington Street, Salford stealing £3 19 shilling and 7 pence, and a box of cigarettes. Breaking and entering the schoolroom on King Street, the Height and stealing 11 pence. Breaking and entering into St Anne's School, Brindleheath, damaging six panes of glass, two pairs of curtains and lengths of woodwork. Breaking and entering Halton Bank School, Bolton Road damaging five electric globes, 38 pound of flour and a water pipe. The boys pleaded guilty to all these charges. Superintendent Clarke told the Court that there had been, "a fifteen day scare" as shops, homes, businesses and schools were targeted, in addition over £1,000 worth of damage had been caused by arson and wilful damage. He asked the Magistrate Mr P. W. Atkin that the boys be sent to the Assizes for sentencing considering the severity of the offences and then dropped the bombshell that at the premises of Messr Thomas Carters Motor Works, Trafford Road, the boys had hung, the workshop cat and killed it. The boys were defended by Mr Howard Flint, who asked the Magistrate if the boys could not be dealt with on this day by the court, adding that they were both from respectable families and had been influenced by reading "trashy cheap, literature" The Magistrate turned down his plea for a trial at the Magistrate Court and added that there was no reason why they should be cruel to a cat. The boys were sent to the Asizes for trial and here is the cliff hanger, I have no idea how they went on there, considering the amount of damage and mayhem they caused I am certain they would be sent to prison and it would that their act of cruelty to a cat ensured they would face the wrath of an Assize Judge.
  18. Another story of love and romance from the pages of the Eccles and Patricroft Journal, October 1920, when love breaks down... John Henry Robinson who lived at Barlow Street, Patricroft appeared at Eccles Magistrates Court, charged with assaulting May Jackson in her home at Blears Buildings, Eccles and smashing crockery belonging to her mother, Margaret Jackson. Margaret Jackson told the Magistrate that Mr Robinson had been "walking out" with her daughter until three months ago and on the night of September 27th he called at the house to see, May. She went to bed but was woken by screams and heard Robinson, cry out, "I have got you now and I will do you in!" He allegedly ripped the blouse off her back and threw her over the table smashing the plates, cups and saucers, laid out. A passing neighbour, Emma Woodhall heard the commotion and rushed in to help, she grabbed hold of Robinson who had forced May to the floor and was twisting her arm and managed to separate them. Robinson took to the witness box and gave a completely different story. He claimed he had called at the house to chat with May, when Margaret Jackson burst into the room and threw a glass at his head, and as for the smashed crockery, he said that he had bought it for them, so it was his, furthermore he had spent between £300 - £400 on the pair of them and this was the way they treated him. Getting into the swing of it, Robinson claimed that May and her sister had been seeing other men behind his back and on one occasion he had been, "brutally assaulted" by the men and had his wallet, containing £7 stolen from him. With a final flourish he told the Magistrate that the two women should have been in the dock, not him. However the Magistrate didn't share his views, and he was fined 10 shillings for the assault and five shillings for the damaged crockery, and warned about his future conduct. Reading between the lines it would appear that Mr Robinson was being strung along by May and her family, showering money and gifts on them. and was better off without them, an unrequited love indeed.
  19. This story from the pages of The Salford City Reporter, October 1920 tells the story of a Salford man whose actions were truly heart-breaking and you have to find pity for him. On a Tuesday evening on the North Pier, Blackpool, a man named as William ***** residing in the Broughton area of Salford, (I haven't given his full name and address for personal reasons) approached a pier attendant and told him the following. "I have dropped my five week old baby son, into the sea" A quick look into the empty baby pram confirmed that, what he had said, was true. Eye witnesses say that his behaviour beforehand was strange and the empty baby pram confirmed their suspicions. When asked why he had done this, he replied, "There were 5,000 of them that went out, and only 50 came back" Whilst telling this he was groaning and holding his head as if in agony, which added to the scene of confusion and horror. The police were summoned and he was taken to the Blackpool Central Station for questioning, a search for the missing child was carried out. to no avail. Inspector Seed and Detective McKenna were put in charge of the case, they brought the man's wife to the station to see if she could shed any light on this tragedy. She told them that her husband had suffered from shell shock in The Great War and was being treated for depression at a local hospital and that they had come to Blackpool for a few days in the hope that the rest and change would do him good. Dr R. H. Dunderdale was called to give him a psychiatric examination and as a result he was declared insane and removed to a mental institution. He was not brought up before a court and it was expected that owing to his condition, no charge would be made against him. Despite a careful search the infant's body had not been recovered from the sea, it was stated that the high tide was a t 5.30pm yesterday the time of the tragedy, and at 7pm there was a strong current running out to sea and the body would have been quickly carried away. A further search of the beach was carried out the next day extending to Bispham but still no sign of the body. I looked through several weeks' editions of the Salford paper and there was no story of the body being found, a tragic tale. The poor man must have seen some terrible sights in the army to drive him insane. many thousands of men suffered from shell shock and it's hard to believe but for a while the army considered soldiers suffering from this lacked moral fibre, i.e they were cowards. The poor wife must have been dealt a hammer blow in losing a child in such an awful way, would she ever recover? Without doubt the saddest story I have ever come across in the years of writing these stories.
  20. I came across this story from October 1920 in the pages of the Eccles and Patricroft Journal and was shocked to read of the treatment meted out to these men who appeared at Manchester County Police Court charged with stealing quantities of potatoes from local farmers' fields. The background to this story is as follows, in October 1920 coal miners went on strike for higher pay, the strike only lasted two weeks but this caused hardship for many families and most of the men who stood in the dock accused of theft were colliers from local pits. Local farmers had complained to the police that for several nights groups of men had been seen in the early hours of the morning stealing potatoes either from the soil or which had been harvested and awaiting collection in baskets. The newspaper reported that "scores" of coal miners were in the fields, stealing the crops and at one stage 200 men and boys were seen stealing. The police were informed and Supt. Keys raised a force of mounted policemen and several dozen policemen who travelled in prison vans were taken to the farms. They launched a raid on the potato pickers and arrested a dozen men, others scattered leaving half filled sacks and shovels on the ground. Mounted police along with uniformed policemen patrolled the fields for the next few days to deter any more thefts with a show of force. Eight men appeared in the dock and a boy aged 11 years of age, they were, George Dale, George Arden, Robert Hodgkiss, Ernest Cullis, Edward Jones, Ernest Vernon, Thomas Atkinson, and Wilson Taylor, The case of George Dale was heard first, with Mr T. Stuttard The Chairman of the Court and Mr J, Crofton was the Prosecuting Officer. Crofton alleged that Dale was caught with 56lb of potatoes and that this court case arose from the coal strike and then launched into an astonishing attack on Dale and the other accused by saying that they behaved as if the crop in the ground was theirs was to be taken and eaten and if this kind of behaviour was not stamped out, "the disease would grow and would ultimately lead to, as it has in the past, rioting and the usual accompaniments" The Chairmen asked him if he was bringing a case of anarchy on the men? He replied that he wasn't but this is where these things lead to. Addressing Dale, the Chairman told him that he couldn't behave as the Germans did in Belgium and France and take anything they liked and fined him £5 and 12 shillings Advocate fees and told him he should be happy he wasn't being sent to prison. Dale asked for a month to pay and was told the decision would come after the trial of the other men. The other accused were given fines ranging from £1 to 10 shillings plus court costs. George Dale had his fine reduced from £5 down to £2 in a rare show of leniency and was given a month to pay.. The Chairman then warned the whole district of Pendlebury that if any more men were brought up before him charged with potato theft they would go straight to prison
  21. A while back I mentioned the shoe repair shop that stood on Barton Lane, Eccles and is now called Linda's Plaice despite it being an Indian Takeaway. Some people remembered the shop as being called, Heywood's Shoe Repairs in the 1950s, i can recall it in the 1970s when it was owned by who I thought was a Polish gentleman. Looking through the Eccles and Patricroft Journal for October 1970, 50 years ago, would you believe? I came across the following story and photograph, entitled, "Shoes For A Circus Clown" The story told that anybody passing the shoe repair shop would be in for a shock as proudly displayed in the shop window, were a pair of clown's shoes, so large that there wasn't a size for them but they were 23 inches long. They had been hand made by the owner of the shop, 57 years old, Dymtro Ostapowycz. We are told that last year Mr Ostapowycz. got a call from a high wire, walker at Belle Vue Circus who wanted a pair of shoes made for him to be used in his act, he did and the chap was delighted at the craftsmanship, so much so he told all his friends in the circus. He then received a telephone call from Sonny Fossett a clown at the circus who wanted a special pair of shoes making, a pair as big as possible and yet still one's he could walk in. Mr Ostapowycz.was obviously a highly skilled man as we were told that he had already made specialised shoes for disabled people and had even shod a Polish dancing troupe from Oldham. After much trial and error the shoes have been finished and are waiting to be picked up, but in the meantime they were proudly displayed in the shop window. Can you imagine if Sonny Fossett decided he was leaving the circus and didn't want the shoes? Finally we learn that Mr Ostapowycz was a Ukranian and came to England in 1947 and spent some time in a displaced persons camp at Banbury. He has had the shop since 1968 and lives in Cheetham Hill with his wife and three children. I do remember the shop and this gentleman, however I was told that he was Polish and had been in one of the concentration camps in Europe, and also had a camp number tattooed on his arm. I have no idea if this is true or an Urban Myth, do you remember Mr Ostapowycz at this shop and had you heard this story
  22. Dipping my toes in the pages of the Salford City Reporter for October 1920, I came across this little story which was headlined, "Ruffians Ejected From Salford Cinema". The Rex Cinema on Chapel Street, Salford is a lovely little building, dating from 1846 and became a cinema in 1912, it's frontage being listed as being of architectural importance, but you don't want to know that, you want to hear about the ruffians in question and how they went on at Salford Magistrates Court. This is how the story unfolded at Court P.C. Mulraney told the Court was on duty on Chapel Street, when he was asked to eject two louts from the cinema who had been upsetting the other customers by shouting, whistling and using "objectionable language" during the showing of the film, you have to remember it was a silent cinema then. The brave P.C. approached the two men and asked them to leave the cinema as there had been complaints about their behaviour, they obeyed his request and followed him onto Chapel Street. He noticed that they had both been drinking and asked them politely to go on their way and not cause any trouble, they replied in the negative and both attacked him. "They fought like madmen and struck me several times about the body and head, I blew my whistle for help and P.C.Cannon came to my assistance. "We attempted to take them into custody at the Town Hall but they became so rough, we had to enlist three of four civilians to help us get them into the station" One of the arrested men, John Boyce aged 22 admitted being drunk but denied assaulting the policemen, saying, he couldn't remember.. The other prisoner, John Brown aged 19 admitted being drunk and he too denied the assault charge. The Clerk of the Court asked P.C. Mulrany if he thought that the men had assaulted him on purpose? "I am quite sure they did" replied the aggrieved P.C. "One of them said he didn't mind being locked up and was up for it" P.C. Cannon took to the witness box and told the Magistrate that as soon as he had gone to P.C. Mulrany's assistance he was struck four or five blows without provocation by the accused men. Detective Smith then took the stand and told the court that both men were Marine Firemen and came from Glasgow, they had arrived at Salford Docks on the Monday evening, the night before they were arrested and werd due to return to Glasgow where they would be paid off. The Magistrate wasn't having any of it and jailed the ruffians for one month with hard labour thrown in for good measure. This didn't mean breaking rocks in the hot sun as the song goes, you were given meagre food rations, soup,mainly, one sheet on your bed, no talking to other prisoners on the landings, no visits etc, a short sharp shock. Once released from Strangeways, the "ruffians" would have had to make their own way back to Glasgow and explain their absence to family and friends. Good luck with that.
  23. I am certain we have all witnessed shocking behaviour on our buses, trains and trams over the years, I can still recall the horror of the last bus out of Victoria bus station as a callow youth and have witnessed a hail of meat and potato pies being hurled in a scene reminiscent of Agincourt, yes the good old days. So this story from August 1919 reminds us that loutish behaviour is not a modern day phenomenon as two drunken chaps bring a new meaning to, men behaving badly. Amos Williams 28, who lived at Irlams Place, Salford appeared at Salford Magistrates Court charged with with being drunk and disorderly in Eccles New Road and assaulting a female tram conductress, Ethel Featherstone. Inspector Mitchell told the Court that Williams and his chum, Joseph Mullen boarded the tram at Eccles Cross and were going to Weaste to meet a female friend. However this journey to meet the mystery woman was curtailed when Amos Williams loutish behaviour resulted in the police being called. Whilst the conductress was collecting fares upstairs, he decided it would be fun to continually ring the bell much to the annoyance of the other passengers. One one occasion he rang the bell so vigorously that driver slammed the brakes on thinking it was an emergency stop, much to Williams amusement. An elderly chap, Edward Smith, had the temerity to tell Williams to behave and asked him what he thought he was playing at? Williams responded by grabbing hold off his legs and dragging him to the floor of the tram, were he began kicking him. Ethel Featherstone. came downstairs to see what all the commotion was about and asked him what he was doing, his reply was to slap her across the face and then attempted to push her off the tram, which fortunately had stopped. I noticed the driver of the tram hasn't come racing to her rescue! The police were called at Weaste and managed to drag the two drunken men off the tram and into police custody and reflect on their behaviour. In his defence, Amos Williams told the Magistrate: "I had drank a lot of beer that day" Truthful but hardly the best defence he could have come up with is it? He was fined £1 or 30 days imprisonment for being drunk and disorderly, also he was fined £3 and six shillings for assaulting Ethel Featherstone or 28 days imprisonment, with the fine being paid to her in costs. P.C. Cormie took to the stand to testify against his co-accused, Joseph Mullen who was also charged with being drunk and disorderly. He told the court that Mullen kept interfering with Williams arrest, using bad language and even going so far as to attempt to incite the tram passengers to help release Williams! Williams was hardly popular with the tram passengers so I should imagine his pleas fell on deaf ears. Mullen told the Magistrate: "All I did was to walk to the police station and see how my pal was and if he needed any money, then I got arrested" He was fined £1 or 14 days imprisonment. So a warning for us all, don't balloon on public transport unless you want to spend the night in the cells and face a possible hefty fine..and I haven't mentioned a single person I know!
  24. Sadly this is not a new phenomenon as the following story from August 1918 will show. Sarah Normond aged 72 of no fixed address appeared at Manchester County Police Court, charged with, "sleeping out" P.C. Walmsley informed the Bench that he was on duty at Worsley Police Station at 7am when Sarah Normond called in and asked if she could be allowed to dry her clothes, explaining that she had slept the night in a nearby field, when a sudden rainstorm had soaked her to the skin. P.C. Walmsley did everything he could to make her comfortable, making her a mug of tea and giving her a blanket to keep warm whilst he dried her sodden clothes. Her conversation and explanation as to how she had come to be sleeping out in the field alarmed him and so he decided to detain her for her own safety and let the Police Court decide on how best to help her. In the dock her conversation to the Chairman, Mr W.A. Rothwell was as equally puzzling. She told him that her father was a well known brewer of beer whilst she herself was strictly tee-total. Carrying on in a similar vein, she stated that she was a widow and was related to the Earl of Marlborough, adding that she didn't come from Manchester but had come from America and had been staying in the Everton district of Liverpool. The Chairman asked her, "If we release you, where will you go?" She replied, "I shall go where I like, I can get my living and I have got money, also I have two son's serving in the British Army and two daughters still living" No doubt concerned for her safety he asked her, "Where do you live in, Manchester?" Her explanation to this question was bizarre to say the least, "I don't belong to Manchester, I shall not go into the workhouse, I have never been in one yet, I have money to live upon, I can get it from the King of England, I can't say anything fairer than that" Again she was told that they only wanted to help her and to trace her relatives, however she would be remanded in custody for a week whilst enquiries were made to trace them. Supt. Rutter of the Manchester Police Force then circulated a description of Sarah Normond to police stations in the Manchester area in an effort to find out who she was. She was described as being aged 72, four foot, ten inches in height, grey hair, grey eyes with a fresh complexion. Her clothing she was wearing when found were described as, a fawn coat, blue skirt, blue stockings, and black lace up boots. Hardly the clothing to wear if you were unfortunate enough to be sleeping outside for any length of time. Sadly I couldn't find a happy ending to this story despite trawling through months of local newspaper reports. It does seem that poor Sarah was suffering from some delusional, mental health issue with talk of rich parents, links to the Earl of Marlborough and even the King of England being brought into the equation. A sad story which asks so many questions as to how a 72 year old woman could end up sleeping rough in a field in Worsley and provides no answers. I do hope that she found some peace in her life and didn't end up in the dreaded workhouse which surely would have been the end of her, sadly I don't think we shall ever find out.
  25. Never a man in need to make up an excuse to find himself in a pub, award-winning local historian and overall man of the people Mr Tony Flynn, embarked on what has quickly become his much anticipated and beloved fun and fact-filled history tour of Eccles Pubs. Despite a spot of inclement weather this Sunday past (29 Jul), the intrepid troupe walked the sodden streets of Eccles in search of the long-lost history of the area, with many long forgotten intriguing tales of the past revealed. Stories were told, pubs were frequented, beer was swigged and more importantly, money was raised for a local charity. In this case the very appreciative local foodbank 'Mustard Tree' who are helping to feed those who have fallen on hard times around Salford. A whopping £250 was raised which was converted into tins and other items for the food bank at the local Jack Fulton's. Flynn's Fandango around Eccles has gained legendary status just like his many sought-after books which are sadly out of print but regularly are sold online by collectors for as much as £500 a pop. Many thanks to another local legend, Albert Spiby for the use of the photos. You can check out many more of them over at our spiritual home on the Salford Online facebook group. https://www.facebook.com/groups/salfordonline/ A huge well done to all those who braved the elements and heartfelt thanks to Tony for being an all-around man of the people and putting it all together. I would raise a glass to him but he has probably still has a hangover
×
×
  • Create New...