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Found 5 results

  1. 51 of the most vulnerable people suffering from homelessness in Salford were given a Covid Vaccine today as part of Salford continuing efforts to lead the way with its outstanding vaccination drive across the City. Calls to vaccinate the homeless and rough sleepers were made last month by a leading homeless charity after it identified that up to 20% of those on the streets were considered to be at high risk because of the virus. It is the nature of their predicament that they are highly exposed on a daily basis, many of them already suffering from underlying physical as well as mental health issues. As many of us adhere to the stay at home warnings, for them it is much more complex because of the lack of an actual home. If you're experiencing and would like to discuss vaccination, please get in touch on Twitter at (1) SPCT Inclusion Service (@ServiceSpct) / Twitter. If you've been offered it HAVE IT!
  2. Salford City Mayor Paul Dennett has pledged to continue the fight against homelessness as Salford marks World Homelessness Day (Saturday October 10.) Mayor Dennett said the council had faced one of its most challenging years ever with the impact of COVID-19 and that a tough winter could lie ahead. He urged anyone worried about debts to seek advice now and pledged to continue the drive to support rough sleepers and provide more affordable housing. This year Salford City Council was highly commended in the Local Authority of the Year award for its work on creating new homes and affordable housing and in tackling poverty which can lead to homelessness. The council’s supported housing team also won two team of the year honours in the national 2020 Housing Heroes awards for cutting rough sleeping by more than 80 per cent and helping over 900 homeless households into settled accommodation including 82 veterans, but Mayor Dennett said the council would not rest on its laurels because of the scale of the challenge. One of the biggest successes in tackling rough sleeping has been the Greater Manchester A Bed Every Night (ABEN) scheme, which Mayor Dennett described as ‘a lifeline.’ Salford also recently secured £417,440 of government funding to provide additional temporary accommodation for rough sleepers as well as longer term private sector options for them - the second largest allocation in Greater Manchester. Paul said:
  3. Sadly this is not a new phenomenon as the following story from August 1918 will show. Sarah Normond aged 72 of no fixed address appeared at Manchester County Police Court, charged with, "sleeping out" P.C. Walmsley informed the Bench that he was on duty at Worsley Police Station at 7am when Sarah Normond called in and asked if she could be allowed to dry her clothes, explaining that she had slept the night in a nearby field, when a sudden rainstorm had soaked her to the skin. P.C. Walmsley did everything he could to make her comfortable, making her a mug of tea and giving her a blanket to keep warm whilst he dried her sodden clothes. Her conversation and explanation as to how she had come to be sleeping out in the field alarmed him and so he decided to detain her for her own safety and let the Police Court decide on how best to help her. In the dock her conversation to the Chairman, Mr W.A. Rothwell was as equally puzzling. She told him that her father was a well known brewer of beer whilst she herself was strictly tee-total. Carrying on in a similar vein, she stated that she was a widow and was related to the Earl of Marlborough, adding that she didn't come from Manchester but had come from America and had been staying in the Everton district of Liverpool. The Chairman asked her, "If we release you, where will you go?" She replied, "I shall go where I like, I can get my living and I have got money, also I have two son's serving in the British Army and two daughters still living" No doubt concerned for her safety he asked her, "Where do you live in, Manchester?" Her explanation to this question was bizarre to say the least, "I don't belong to Manchester, I shall not go into the workhouse, I have never been in one yet, I have money to live upon, I can get it from the King of England, I can't say anything fairer than that" Again she was told that they only wanted to help her and to trace her relatives, however she would be remanded in custody for a week whilst enquiries were made to trace them. Supt. Rutter of the Manchester Police Force then circulated a description of Sarah Normond to police stations in the Manchester area in an effort to find out who she was. She was described as being aged 72, four foot, ten inches in height, grey hair, grey eyes with a fresh complexion. Her clothing she was wearing when found were described as, a fawn coat, blue skirt, blue stockings, and black lace up boots. Hardly the clothing to wear if you were unfortunate enough to be sleeping outside for any length of time. Sadly I couldn't find a happy ending to this story despite trawling through months of local newspaper reports. It does seem that poor Sarah was suffering from some delusional, mental health issue with talk of rich parents, links to the Earl of Marlborough and even the King of England being brought into the equation. A sad story which asks so many questions as to how a 72 year old woman could end up sleeping rough in a field in Worsley and provides no answers. I do hope that she found some peace in her life and didn't end up in the dreaded workhouse which surely would have been the end of her, sadly I don't think we shall ever find out.
  4. In a recent blog update, Mayor Burnham has outlined his stratergy for dealing with the annual problem of how to best help rough sleepers across Greater Manchester and has called upon local councils to follow in the footsteps of Manchester in guaranteeing a bed for each an every rough sleeper this winter. Meanwhile, Salford has already taken a big step in helping to provide eight beds and 20 self contained homes to help in the battle to put an end to rough sleeping. This morning, I have been out and about in the city centre on my regular walkabout, speaking to people sleeping rough. I do this every few months to keep in touch with the issues that people raise and to get a real and unvarnished picture of the scale of the challenge facing us. When people comment on current levels of homelessness, it is often based on what they can see on the streets during the day. But the truth is that does not always provide an accurate picture. It is certainly true that many of the people in the city centre during the day are also sleeping rough there at night. But not everyone. It is not callous or uncaring to say that we need to do a better job of drawing that distinction and focus our fundraising efforts on those who genuinely have nowhere else to go. This morning, we came across around 15 to 20 people in the city centre. One is of course too many but it represents progress on what I was seeing this time last year. I want to thank all of our public bodies, housing providers and voluntary organisations who are working well together and making a real difference. But we have further to go and I believe that now is the right time to go up a gear. Later today, I will attend a meeting of the Greater Manchester Homelessness Action Network to provide an update on progress towards meeting our ambition of ending the need for rough sleeping in Greater Manchester by 2020. The time has come to lay out a clear plan for how we will achieve this. As part of this, we need to ask whether now is the time for a significant escalation of our efforts, starting this winter. Last year, Greater Manchester put in place an improved set of cold weather arrangements. There were two big learning points that need to be taken on board. The first is that opening provision, closing it when the temperature rises only to reopen it again days later causes confusion and extra cost. The second is that, when people got the opportunity to stay in one place for a longer period (and they did during one of the longer cold spells), they began to open up to working with services to move them forward. So the big question that I will put today is this: can Greater Manchester aim to provide a bed for every rough sleeper every night of the week over this coming winter? This is a major commitment and will be a real challenge to deliver. But it is the right question to be asking at this stage of our journey towards ending the need for rough sleeping. Later this year, Greater Manchester will begin to roll out the Housing First pilot. Our hope is that significant numbers of new places (homes plus an individual package of support) will be opening in the early months of 2019. By enhancing our rough sleeping provision at the same time we will provide a solid platform on which Housing First will be built. It is more likely to be successful if people can be stabilised in temporary accommodation before moving through to a Housing First place. That has been a key point of learning from the operation of our Social Impact Bond, which has now housed over 100 of the longest-term rough sleepers. Of course, providing a bed every night from October to March would come at a significant extra cost. Manchester City Council has already made a commitment to aim for this and many of our councils will be providing extra support over the winter. But they will not have enough on their own and the question is whether we should launch a new fundraising drive to support this specific purpose. Today I want to hear views on this from members of the Homelessness Action Network. If people think it is a good idea, I would be prepared to ask the trustees of the Mayor’s Homelessness Fund to redirect funds to the A Bed Every Night scheme. Tim Heatley, the leader of Greater Manchester’s Homelessness Business Network, has also agreed to focus his efforts with the business community on fundraising for the scheme if people agree it’s the right way to go. If we can make it work, A Bed Every Night would be a partnership with our 10 councils. Earlier this week, I met councillors with local responsibility for tackling homelessness and we plan to start early work with them on drawing up local plans. New buildings will need to be identified in each area. We are grateful to Reverend Ian Rutherford, who leads Greater Manchester’s Homelessness Faith Network, for assisting us in this task. Many churches, mosques and other faith buildings were used last winter and we are hoping that even more will be found for this. One of the great benefits of a six-month scheme of this kind is that it would enable us to gain a clear picture of the costs, challenges and benefits of providing stable daily provision for all rough sleepers. If it works, and could be made financially sustainable, I would intend to repeat the scheme in October 2019 but at that point consider making A Bed Every Night permanent, thereby delivering my manifesto commitment. However, we also need to have our eyes open to the risks. There is an argument to say that, the stronger Greater Manchester’s ambition on rough sleeping, the more we will become a magnet for people to come here and the greater our problem will be. The truth is there is no real evidence to say that this is actually happening to any significant degree and, to the extent that any people have come, the numbers are small. However, to ensure that we can afford it, A Bed Every Night would need to be limited, perhaps to people whose last permanent address before becoming homeless was in Greater Manchester and also to those who have no recourse to public funds. In the end, the best way to approach this is for Greater Manchester to do what feels right for us and encourage other cities and towns to provide the same. While there are risks to A Bed Every Night, it would also bring opportunities. When we are confident that there is enough provision for every night, I do think we will be able to give a clearer message to the public about on-street giving. As we know, while we all understand it and still do it, it doesn’t actually help people begin the journey away from the street. By launching A Bed Every Night well in advance of the coming winter, we would be able to send a clear message that the best way to help this winter would be donated to the central pot. I would be interested in hearing people’s views on this blog and the proposed A Bed Every Night scheme. I know that we are setting ourselves a big challenge and also that, as of yet, we don’t have all the funds to deliver it. But, if Greater Manchester gets behind it, I am confident that we can end the need for rough sleeping here this winter and create a strong platform for the success of Housing First. Whatever our challenges as a country, we are rich enough to put a roof over every head every night of the week and I hope that in Greater Manchester at least, this will soon become the norm. Thank you for your ongoing interest and support. Andy
  5. Salford City Council will provide eight new emergency beds along with 20 self-contained homes where people can stay until long-term settled accommodation is found for them. A new support team will help them overcome any barriers such as finding a deposit, finding accommodation which will take a pet or buying household items to set up home – as well as supporting those still on the streets. Councillor Tracy Kelly, lead member for housing and neighbourhoods, announced the news after launching Salford’s new Homelessness Strategy, which sets out the city’s plans for the next five years. Councillor Kelly said: Councillor Kelly also called for the whole city to pull together to help rough sleepers and people facing the risk of homelessness, saying only an even greater combined effort from the council, NHS, housing and advice services, community and voluntary organisations and residents could tackle the crisis. She said: Councillor Kelly said over the next five years Salford would also focus on providing truly affordable homes and encouraging people in financial difficulties to seek help as soon as possible to avoid the risk of defaulting on payments and losing their homes. Salford City Council is also supporting Greater Manchester-wide initiatives to eradicate the need for rough sleeping. These include the housing first approach of finding rough sleepers homes and then helping them with other issues and a Greater Manchester-wide social lettings agency, which helps vulnerable people and people on low incomes to find and keep private rented homes. You can view the new strategy at www.salford.gov.uk/homelessstrategy Note to editors: Rough sleeping rose from 19 in 2016 to 49 in 2017 as people sleeping in night shelters were also included in the count for the first time.
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