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  1. Salford’s hidden gem – Ordsall Hall is to reopen after being forced to close due to the Covid-19 pandemic. And the reopening, on Tuesday 18 May, marks the 10th anniversary of the restoration of Salford’s oldest building. The 800 year old manor house closed to the public in 2009 for a 2 year transformative £6.5k restoration, with the support of the Heritage Lottery Fund. It reopened its door as a free museum and public garden on the 15th May 2011, and since has been visited by over 300,000 people. To celebrate 10 years since the reopening of the site, from the 15th May to the 26th May, the museum will be running an online lecture series, with local historians and academics, exploring the history and architecture of the Hall and the redevelopment of Salford Quays. The museum will reopen to the public on Tuesday 18th May 2021, following the reopening of the gardens on the 29th March 2021. The museum, shop and café will be open every Monday, Tuesday and Sunday and visits to the historic rooms and museum galleries will be available to prebook via their website from the 15th May 2021. www.ordsallhall.com Jennifer Holland, Audience Development and Events Manager said, Salford City Mayor Paul Dennett said: “It is great news that Salford’s historic Orsdall Hall is able to open to the public again. The 820 year old building has been so tastefully restored and I’d definitely recommend a visit.” All profits made from the lecture series will go to the upkeep of Ordsall Hall & Gardens. Deciphering Ordsall Hall’s Layers of Gothic History Dr Peter Lindfield Honorary Fellow of History at MMU Saturday 15th May 6pm-7pm Ticket £5 Deciphering Ordsall Hall’s Layers of Gothic History: Medieval to Victorian Tickets, Sat 15 May 2021 at 18:00 | Eventbrite Upcoming Events Explore Ordsall Hall and Area with AlexaTours: Greater Manchester Green Badge Tour Guide Alexandra Fairclough Architectural Historian and Tour Guide Sunday 23rd May 4pm-5pm Tickets £5.98 EXPLORE ORDSALL HALL AND AREA:770 years of History Tickets, Sun, May 23, 2021 at 4:00 PM | Eventbrite The Quays at 20: An Architectural History of Salford Quays Dr Mike Nevell, University of Salford Wednesday 26th May 6.30pm-7.30pm Tickets £5 LINK (TBC when created) To prebook a visit to the Museum please go to: https://family-showround.eventbrite.co.uk https://historic-tour.eventbrite.co.uk https://sun-showround.eventbrite.co.uk https://witchcraft.eventbrite.co.uk Image: Ordsall Hall
  2. Over the past few weeks we have telling you about Sue Richardson and the excellent work she has been doing for over 40 years in publishing local history books that cover both Salford and Manchester at affordable prices. I first met Neil in 1977 and together we set about doing extensive research into Salford pubs, photographing them, chatting to customers and Landlords alike, and yes we did imbibe quite a few pints, but serious research can be thirsty work.....I digress. Looking back, I am so glad we did the Salford pub books,because as you know Salford has lost so many pubs for so many reasons, and we managed to document their history's for posterity. In 1981 I branched out on my own when Neil went full time as a printer/publisher and author, I decided to write a history of the pubs of Eccles from 1772 onwards, some 40 pubs. Only 1.000 were run off and quickly sold out I'm happy to say, the printing plates were never used again and have been lost over the years. I have been asked many times to do an up to date version, but to be honest I haven't the inclination and things are moving so fast the new updated book would soon be redundant, and I am a lazy sod. You can imagine my shock when I saw a copy for sale on the Amazon site for a staggering £500 a few years back, my spirits were lifted when I was told there was a copy on sale in an Oxfam Charity Shop in Cheshire, for the knockdown price of £250...well if you are daft enough to pay that, good luck to you, I wouldn't. However I was chatting to Sue at weekend and I mentioned that I usually do a history walk around Eccles twice a year to raise both money and food for the Mustard Tree Foodbank and Broughton House, the nursing home for armed forces veterans. The Covid crisis has wiped out one of the walks for certain, however. With advances in printing techniques, Sue has told me that we can now reprint A History Of The Pubs Of Eccles, be still my beating heart! I have decided if enough people are interested in buying a copy, we can run off a strictly limited number of the book, each one numbered and signed, and the profits to be shared between above named charities. The sticking point is how many to reprint and how much to charge? I think 100 to be published and charge a £10 a copy is about right, and yes I know it was originally only a quid but that was nearly 40 years ago and the money is for charity and not for my Swiss bank account or for paying for the upkeep of Alma Towers, West Wing. So there you go, so if you are interested in purchasing a valuable piece of social history which is bound to increase in value over the years, an ideal gift for your grandchildren. a talking point when left on your smoked glass coffee table, you know the dance, let me know?
  3. I have heard the saying that if you go in somebody's you can guarantee there will be a glass from a local pub in there, I think this saying can be extended to a copy of a Neil Richardson, local history publication. We visited Sue Richardson's house in Ringley Village to see a truly amazing collection of books, Trade Directories, maps, photographs and even a bound collection of the Manchester Guardian newspaper from 1821 - 1972, a historians dream. Neil who sadly passed away in 2006 was good friend of mine and I am proud to have known him, I first met him in 1977 when he was the Editor of the Camra magazine, What's Doing, an hilarious and often Irreverent newsletter about local pubs and breweries. Together with Alan Gall we wrote , A History of Salford Pubs volume one, this was published in 1978 and from then on things snowballed as Neil assisted by Sue set up his own publishing company and began publishing affordable, local history publications, and put in print many. many authors, myself included whose work, would have never seen the light of day. His publications covered a vast area of Salford and Manchester with such topics as Salford Docks, memories of Hulme, Rochdale, Oldham, Bury, Miles Platting. Hanky Park, Weaste, housing conditions in Victorian Manchester, the history of long defunct breweries and pubs, cinemas, dance halls, policing, WW! and WW2 local regiments, the Blitz and far to many to mention here, in all some 200 publications were printed, this has now been whittled down to around 100 or so. Sue Richardson has continued with this legacy and from home still reprints much of the back catalogue and the odd new publication, single-headedly, a cottage industry you could call it, but more importantly she provides an invaluable service for both the keen local historian and the person who has a love for a certain area and likes to reminisce about days gone by. I am delighted to say that Sue has managed to keep up, just printing the books but has been hard hit for sales with the Covid crisis, however she has informed that she is still doing postal sales and can be contacted at home where she will be happy to discuss sales with you, but please phone before calling at her home address. Please contact Sue on 01204 578138 or via email at wattywalton@btconnect.com Or If you send a Stamped Addressed Envelope to Sue at 88 Ringley Road, Stoneclough, Radcliffe, Manchester, M26 1ET. She will send you a catalogue of all of the over 100 books available Finally Sue tells me that her email is a bit slow at the moment but rest assured each one will be answered, if you get stuck, you can message me at, tony@salford.media and I will pass messages on. So please support your local small business at this most testing of times and Sue fully deserves all of our help and support For a full list of available books please attached file: Download
  4. Another story of love and romance from the pages of the Eccles and Patricroft Journal, October 1920, when love breaks down... John Henry Robinson who lived at Barlow Street, Patricroft appeared at Eccles Magistrates Court, charged with assaulting May Jackson in her home at Blears Buildings, Eccles and smashing crockery belonging to her mother, Margaret Jackson. Margaret Jackson told the Magistrate that Mr Robinson had been "walking out" with her daughter until three months ago and on the night of September 27th he called at the house to see, May. She went to bed but was woken by screams and heard Robinson, cry out, "I have got you now and I will do you in!" He allegedly ripped the blouse off her back and threw her over the table smashing the plates, cups and saucers, laid out. A passing neighbour, Emma Woodhall heard the commotion and rushed in to help, she grabbed hold of Robinson who had forced May to the floor and was twisting her arm and managed to separate them. Robinson took to the witness box and gave a completely different story. He claimed he had called at the house to chat with May, when Margaret Jackson burst into the room and threw a glass at his head, and as for the smashed crockery, he said that he had bought it for them, so it was his, furthermore he had spent between £300 - £400 on the pair of them and this was the way they treated him. Getting into the swing of it, Robinson claimed that May and her sister had been seeing other men behind his back and on one occasion he had been, "brutally assaulted" by the men and had his wallet, containing £7 stolen from him. With a final flourish he told the Magistrate that the two women should have been in the dock, not him. However the Magistrate didn't share his views, and he was fined 10 shillings for the assault and five shillings for the damaged crockery, and warned about his future conduct. Reading between the lines it would appear that Mr Robinson was being strung along by May and her family, showering money and gifts on them. and was better off without them, an unrequited love indeed.
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