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Found 10 results

  1. LS Lowry could have easily painted pretty landscapes but instead he chose to paint what he saw, and that is without a doubt the most defining trait of Salford, we say it how it is, we tell it how it is and we keep it real. So with that same spirit in heart, add local wordsmith Simon Williams to that list, he has put pen to paper to recall a vision of a Salford he witnessed himself as he grew up here, a Salford that for many is long gone, all but existing in memories. The perfectly titled book 'My Salford: Poems From The Heart' is a collection of 40 poems that are utterly un
  2. I am certain we have all witnessed shocking behaviour on our buses, trains and trams over the years, I can still recall the horror of the last bus out of Victoria bus station as a callow youth and have witnessed a hail of meat and potato pies being hurled in a scene reminiscent of Agincourt, yes the good old days. So this story from August 1919 reminds us that loutish behaviour is not a modern day phenomenon as two drunken chaps bring a new meaning to, men behaving badly. Amos Williams 28, who lived at Irlams Place, Salford appeared at Salford Magistrates Court charged with with bein
  3. For the answer lets take a visit to Salford Magistrates Court, September 1918 to see what the Stipendiary Magistrate had to say. Our story starts on board the S.S. Chicago City a Cunard Liner boat that was moored at Porto Empedecole in Southern Italy, which was picking up amongst other cargo, cases of wine to be transported back to Salford Docks. What could go wrong?....The Captain was soon to find out. Alarm bells should have rung when it was noticed that several seamen had begun drinking heavily from the cargo being loaded onto the boat from cargo lighter boats, a type of fla
  4. This story from the pages of the Eccles and Patricroft Journal from September 1918 is a mixture of both of the above emotions and an almost happy ending for once. Corporal David Macfarlane who resided at Cross Street, Eccles was before the outbreak of war a postman on the streets of Eccles and by all accounts a well known man in the Borough. He was no stranger to combat having fought in the Boer War in South Africa and in October 1916 he joined the 2/5th Battalion of the Lancashire Fusilier and was soon in action. He fought in the Third Battle of Ypres where his regiment suffere
  5. It is said that a man in uniform does indeed attract the ladies, sadly this knight in shining armour turned out to be a cad and a bounder amongst other things. Our story begins with the Rutter family from Salford taking a short holiday in Bakewell, a small market town and civil parish in the Derbyshire Dales district of Derbyshire. The daughter Emily met a soldier Private William Graham from the West Yorkshire Regiment who was convalescing in a nearby Military Hospital from injuries he had received on the Western Front and they soon struck up a friendship. Emily asked him
  6. Sadly this is not a new phenomenon as the following story from August 1918 will show. Sarah Normond aged 72 of no fixed address appeared at Manchester County Police Court, charged with, "sleeping out" P.C. Walmsley informed the Bench that he was on duty at Worsley Police Station at 7am when Sarah Normond called in and asked if she could be allowed to dry her clothes, explaining that she had slept the night in a nearby field, when a sudden rainstorm had soaked her to the skin. P.C. Walmsley did everything he could to make her comfortable, making her a mug of tea and giving her a
  7. Never a man in need to make up an excuse to find himself in a pub, award-winning local historian and overall man of the people Mr Tony Flynn, embarked on what has quickly become his much anticipated and beloved fun and fact-filled history tour of Eccles Pubs. Despite a spot of inclement weather this Sunday past (29 Jul), the intrepid troupe walked the sodden streets of Eccles in search of the long-lost history of the area, with many long forgotten intriguing tales of the past revealed. Stories were told, pubs were frequented, beer was swigged and more importantly, money was
  8. And so keeping the ball rolling with the football theme, I bring you this story culled from the pages of the Eccles and Patricroft Journal, July 1918. An everyday story of neighbours falling out over the trivial matter of a football landing in there garden which in turn leads to an appearance at the local court with a charge of assault and wilful damage. Eccles Magistrates Court heard the case which didn't go into extra time thanks to the Magistrate keeping his eye on his watch and deciding that 90 minutes was enough for anybody. James Knowles who resided at Stanley Avenue, Eccl
  9. This coming June 11th, International Man of History and award winning author Mr Tony Flynn, will be embarking on another of his legendary historical pub walks around Eccles. Meeting 12 pm at Eccles Train station and finishing at 2 pm outside the Royal Oak pub, learn about murder, mayhem, bodysnatchers, millionaires, arsenic beer, rioting, looting, celebrities, secret tunnels, and thats all in one pub! Tickets will be just £4 and will involve a drinkypoo in the Lamb, and maybe a half in the Albert Edward. (It's not his round). Tony says ... Tony needs no in
  10. Founded as the 'United Kingdom Van Dwellers Protection Association' in 1889, it went on to become known as the Showmen's Guild in 1917 and recognised as the trade association for the travelling funfair business. The Guild represents the business at both local and national levels to this very day, some 128 years after its launch. Its chaplain and first General Secretary was the Reverend Thomas Horne who was based in Didsbury, Manchester, and the Lancashire, Cheshire and North Wales Section of the Showmen’s Guild played a prominent role in these early years. The Showmen’s Guild was formally
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